Hojoki: Collaboration Space for Cloud-Based Apps

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With the advent of cloud-based document management systems, such as Google Drive, DropBox, SugarSync, SkyDrive, we now have the problem of having information and documents in multiple places. So where did you file that document? And in what system?

Hojoki is an app that provides a way to see all your cloud-based apps in one view. It integrates Google Drive, Google Calendar, Evernote, Dropbox and Pocket plus about 25 more different apps. It has universal cloud search capabilities. It also allows teams to create customized workspaces that you can add folders from multiple cloud-based systems such as Google Drive and DropBox. It also has a basic task list however it does not give the capabilities of due or start dates. Take the demo and see if it might work for you.

This article from Fast Company also provides a good overview of hojoki.

Becoming a Paperless Office: Create a Clear System to Manage Electronic Documents

According to a study by the CAP Venture Group, it is estimated that 80% of information is still retained on paper even though more than 80% of the documents we work with are already in a computer somewhere. According to Xerox, approximately 30% of printed documents are for one-time use only and further studies found that about 45% of documents printed in a typical office are thrown away within 24 hours. Another Gartner study called “Electronic Document Management” revealed that the average document was copied between nine and eleven times.

One of the keys in gaining efficiencies in data management and increasing productivity is to reduce the paper workers manage. A key component to creating a paperless office is to create user trust in finding and accessing data electronically. Employees are inundated with data in multiple formats and finding it more and more difficult to manage the amount of data and be effective and efficient at their job. Without a consolidated system to manage data along with sound file structure and data management guidelines users will tend to keep a ‘backup’ copy of data and records in paper. Although paper does have its uses for work purposes such as reading, reviewing at meetings or processing data, it is not the optimal format to archive, store and file records and documents. When moving towards a paperless office it becomes even more vital that file structures, whether on a Shared Drive network or in a cloud-based system, is well-organized. It is also important that there is a clear and designated location to store data when there are multiple document and record systems available to users. Finally, data management practices need to be clearly defined such as document naming conventions, versioning, and data conventions.

To learn how to organize electronic files on the shared drive, download the report How to Organize Electronic Documents on Shared Drive Networks. Or you are welcome to contact us and we can assist you.